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The Burren

Where to go in Ireland

Dublin Castle

Dublin Castle

The Dublin Castle structure was mostly built in the 18th century. The castle was the center of Britain’s rule in Ireland until 1922, after which, it was transformed into an Irish government complex.

It was also the home of the Irish Crown Jewels until they were stolen in 1907.

Today, the castle is used as headquarters whenever Ireland hosts the European Union presidency, and for other important government-related functions such as Ireland’s presidential inaugurations, state visits, and state banquets.

An art center is found in the castle, and occasional concerts are held in its grounds. The biggest crowd drawers, however, are the luxuriously decorated state apartments, including St. Patrick’s Hall, where the state inaugurations and functions are held; the regally adorned Throne Room, built in 1821 to welcome King George IV; and the State Dining Room, the oldest room in the castle, which still looks pretty much like it did when Lord Chesterfield dined in it in the days when the castle was just newly built.

The castle is open to the public, except when it is being used for state functions. Entrance is free on the first Wednesday of every month. The State Apartments can be accessed through guided tours only.

Killarney 

Killarney 

Killarney is a town located in the southwest region of Ireland. It is surrounded by other Irish tourist spots such as St. Mary’s Cathedral, Ross Castle, Muckross House and Abbey, Dunloe Gap, and the Lakes of Killarney.

Voted as the Best Kept Town by Ireland’s Department of Environment, Killarney is a popular tourist destination because of its beauty, history, and geographic proximity to many other tourist attractions. Visitors can enjoy the flora and fauna at the blossoming Flower Garden in Muckross House or go cycling around this pristine town.

For the nature hounds, Killarney is not devoid of attractive nature parks. Some of the more popular tourist destinations in this area are the Lakes of Killarney, the Killarney National Park, and the Black Valley.

For history buffs, Killarney’s Ross Castle is a must-see. It features boat tours, 15th century medieval architecture, and a huge collection of 16th to 17th century oak furniture.

Adare 

Adare 

Adare, which is situated in County Limerick, is known to be one of the prettiest villages in Ireland. Perhaps this is the reasons why the town is one of the Emerald Isle’s most popular venues for weddings.

Designated as a heritage town by Ireland’s government, the town of Adare is well crafted to become a real tourist destination and heritage center. The main streets of the village are a combination of Old English and Irish architecture. The village houses are mostly English-styled and estate-like. There are six open public houses that tourists can visit: Collins, Sean Collins, Auntie Lena’s, Thatch, Bill Chawke’s, and Neville’s.

Visitors can learn about the village’s history at the heritage center. You can also visit Desmond Castle, which was first built in the 12th century, and the ruins of the Franciscan Abbey, which was built in the 1400s and where dawn mass is still celebrated every Easter morning.

Belfast

Belfast

Belfast used to be one of the largest and most efficient shipyards in the world. The famous RMS Titanic was built here in the early 20th century.

Today, Belfast is visited because it is home to the Belfast Castle and the Carrickfergus Castle, which were both built during the Middle Ages.

The Giant’s Ring, one of the finest henge monuments found in Ireland, is also found in this city.

Belfast has a number of cultural zones, or quarters, for its visitors. The Cathedral Quarter is the city’s most important cultural locality. It holds yearly festivals that showcase different forms of art, such as theater, music, and literature.

The city also has many outdoor concert venues, such as the Custom House Square, and centers of excellence, such as the Gaeltacht Quarter, which promotes the study and use of the Irish language.

Croagh Patrick

Croagh Patrick

Croagh Patrick is the Irish translation for St. Patrick’s Stack. The 764 meter (2,507 foot) tall mountain has been mentioned in many pagan texts, some of which date back to the 1100s.

The mountain is revered as the Holy Hill of Ireland. It has been said St. Patrick himself fasted for forty days on the mountain’s summit. Legend also has it that after his fast, St. Patrick battled with the pagan goddess Corra, who took the form of a snake. He won the battle, and the goddess – along with all other snakes – left Ireland.

On Reek Sunday, the last Sunday of July each year, thousands of pilgrims come to this site to gain indulgence for their sins.

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