Black Forest cake

Who on earth has not heard of the Black Forest cake?

 This cake, locally known as Schwarzwälder Kirschtorte, was named after the Black Forest in Germany, where authentic Black Forest cakes are also made.

 Though many variants of the Black Forest cake already exist all over the world, there are a few ingredients that are universally found in each and every Black forest cake: red cherries, fresh whipped cream, and fudgy chocolate cake. The top of the cake is always adorned by swirls of thick whipped cream; each swirl is topped by a whole cherry.

Of course, if you’re looking for the original recipe, you know where to find it: at the Black Forest itself, in Germany.

Apfelstrudel

Germans love their desserts, which is why the next food on this list is the Apfelstrudel.

 Similar to the all-American apple pie, the Apfelstrudel is a pie which is filled with apples and topped with powdered sugar. Some even top it with vanilla ice cream and a drizzle of chocolate sauce.

To make the Apfelstrudel, you need fresh apples, flour, and sugar. It’s very much like making an apple pie.

Mix the ingredients to form the dough, knead well and spread the dough to make it very thin, put in the apples, and cook in the oven.

 After baking, you can personalize your Apfelstrudel according to your taste, by sprinkling it with more powdered sugar, chocolate sauce, or even caramel.

Currywurst

 Currywurst is one of Germany’s favorite fast food dishes – nearly a billion of it is consumed in the country per year, and a study has suggested that 80% of Germans consider the dish a major part of their diet.

Of course, this is not a surprise, since Germany is known for having some of the best-tasting sausages in the world.

 This sausage is usually served on a paper plate, with bread rolls or French fries on the side. Some establishments cut the sausage first into bite-sized pieces before topping it with  sauce.

Almost any type of German sausage or Wurst can be used; it is the sauce or the powder that defines Currywurst.

This is a favorite snack during the Oktoberfest and tastes really good when washed down with beer.

 The origin of Currywurst is still being contested, but the patent for its sauce (dated 1951) belongs to a food stall owner named Herta Heuwer, who claims she invented the dish in 1949 by mixing Worcestershire sauce and curry powder with ketchup.

Sauerbraten

Considered as one of the national dishes of Germany, Sauerbraten literally translates to “sour roast.”

This fine piece of meat is simply beef pot roast marinated in vinegar, water, and some seasonings.

Aside from beef, Sauerbraten can also be made from mutton, lamb, chicken, pork or venison.

 All across Germany, local towns have their own versions of sauerbraten, which are differentiated by their marinade and gravy or sauce.

This dish is usually served with pasta or potatoes which can be mashed, boiled, or fried.

 To make Sauerbraten, the piece of meat is marinated in a mixture of vinegar, water, wine and other spices for four to ten days. This dish was originally made with horse meat, but through the years, recipes were developed to fit other types of roasting meat.

 Many important figures such as Charlemagne and Saint Albertus Magnus lay some claim to having invented the dish; until today, it is not certain as to who really invented it.

Schnitzel

Of all the dishes mentioned above, the most popular dish of all would probably be the Schnitzel. This dish is found in almost every menu all over the world, in every establishment that serves German food.

 The Schnitzel is simply a deboned piece of meat which has been battered and fried. This is also a favorite in most fast foods; it is served with fries and a tall glass of authentic German beer.

 To make Schnitzel, raw meat is thinned out using a mallet and then coated in bread crumbs and fried immediately. If veal is used, it will be called Wiener Schnitzel.

 There are also other Schnitzels in Germany which are not cooked with breadcrumbs; instead; a special sauce is poured over it, or lemon juice is simply squeezed onto the meat.

This article is also available in: Spanish