Finland’s location between the 60° and 70° northern parallels determines its weather, but compared to countries in the same latitude,Finland enjoys higher temperature because of the Baltic Sea and of the Gulf Stream warming the airflows from the Atlantic Ocean.

The four seasons distinctively enhance the beauty of Finland. During winter, which is the longest season in the country, the landscape is well covered with clean snow, and winter activities are in full swing.

Winter in southern Finland generally starts in November. But in Lapland, which is just above the Arctic Circle, winter begins in October and lasts until April.

In southern Finland, winter temperature can go as low as –20 °C (–4 °F). In Lapland, the temperature is a lot more freezing and drops to –45 to –50 °C (–49 to –58 °F).

Spring starts in March in some parts of the country. At this point, ice begins to melt and the surroundings slowly show more colors.

March is particularly characterized by a temperature of around 0 °C (32 °F), but come April,Finland becomes a little warmer with a temperature of around 10 to 20 °C (50 to 68 °F).

Lapland experiences spring only around early May.

When summer finally kicks in,Finland becomes brightly beautiful, with the landscape displaying very sharp colors of the tress, flowers, and plants. The country becomes busy with different outdoor activities and festivals, especially between late June and late July – the peak of summer tourism.

From late June to mid-August, the temperature is averaged at 20 to 23 °C (68 to 73 °F). But it can go as high as 25 °C (77 °F), which is considered hot in Finnish standards.

What makes summer especially interesting is the phenomenon called midnight sun, when the sun doesn’t literally set for several weeks in northern Finland.

Autumn generally begins in late August, at which point, autumn foliage begins to manifest in Lapland. In some parts of Finland, autumn foliage occurs only by September to October. Autumn is also marked by a drop in temperature and frosty nights and days.

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